Years 7-9 – How to answer all of the Qs on your exam

Read the document thoroughly.  ensure that you pay close attention to what you do in each question and how long it should take you.

Paper 1 Overview

Some of you may find it useful to learn some of these sentence stems for each question.

Language Paper 1 Sentence stems

There are some additional practice papers attached below:

The Woman in Black INSERT Paper 1 RB

The Woman in Black Paper 1 RB

AQA Paper 1 Section A To Kill a Mockingbird extract MLy

 

9A HW

  • When you have your books back, go through and correct any mistakes and answer any questions that I have left.
  • Read back through the information sheet on The Role of Women that is in your book, and summarise each section into one sentence.

 

3) Add to your Macbeth vocabulary page, with the definition of these terms, and learn them for spelling test on Monday 16th.

  1. Chivalry
  2. Cowardice
  3. Conflict
  4. Desire
  5. Soliloquy
  6. Superstition
  7. Tyranny
  8. Usurp
  9. Villainy
  10. Catharsis​

Year 9 Grammar – ‘Have’ ‘Of’

Year 9, Week 7

‘Have’ and ‘Of’

Revise this information from Year 7:

When we contract could have or would have into could’ve and would’ve, it might sound like you are saying could of and would of. Could of and would of are incorrect and do not mean anything

I could have gone home.        I could’ve gone home.                                  I could of gone home. x

I would have gone home.       I would’ve gone home.                                 I would of gone home. x

It is a good idea to memorise the type of words that have usually goes with. These are called modal verbs and they suggest how likely it is that something will happen.

Modal verbs

may   – It may have already started.

must   – It must have been his turn.

would – He would have been one hundred and ten today.

could – I could have gone home two hours ago.

shall –  I shall have bought one by next week.

should – I should have returned it.

might – He might have been there.

Verb agreement: It is important when you are writing to remain in the tense that you started writing in, unless you are making a deliberate change. This means that all of the verbs you use need to agree with the tense that you want to write.

Verb agreement in the past tense
It is usually easiest to stay in the correct tense when you are writing in the past tense as most stories are written in the past tense and we usually tell stories in the past tense. However, it is possible to get confused:
I lived in a town where there are lots of other teenagers.

Even though you might think that the town still has lots of teenagers, you need to keep the sentence in the past tense. The correct way to write this would be:

I lived in a town where there were lots of other teenagers.

Verb agreement in the present tense
The present tense can be more difficult to control as we are more used to using past tense forms and these can often creep in:
There is a girl on the bus in front of me. She picked up her bag and moved forward. I stare out of the window.

This example has a mixture of present and past tense verbs. The paragraph began in the present tense, however, with is so should continue in this way. Picked and moved are past tense verbs and so have been misused.

The paragraph should read:

There is a girl on the bus in front of me. She picks up her bag and moves forward. I stare out of the window.